Managing your letter of offer

Getting a new job is exciting. You might be searching for a new role for longer than you’d like. You’ve been to some interviews and nothing has eventuated. Perhaps you’re almost out of energy, determination and hope.  Then you get that one phone call that makes you forget all the hard work – a verbal job offer. Before you accept, running off to pop some champagne and celebrate a new job offer, have you seen anything in writing?

Be careful

You’d almost given up, you were almost going to settle for a pay cut or even a step back. Why wouldn’t you accept a verbal job offer? You’ve finally landed the role you wanted! What a relief. You might even accept on the spot. This article talks about why it’s crucial to have a written offer in hand before you verbally accept a position – even if it’s your dream job. Make sure all the details are in writing before you accept that offer. At a minimum you should know exactly what your base/retainer will be, OTE (on target earnings), benefits and your hours/roster. For example, most Dealer Principal / General Manager roles include a vehicle, phone and fuel – but not always. Every dealership is different, so getting a letter of offer in writing ensures that you know exactly what you’re agreeing to.

Answering the call

When the call comes, you need to be prepared to handle the silence after the offer. Before you get that offer, take some time to come up with something using the following guidelines;

  • Thank them for the call
  • It’s fine to tell them you’re pleased, thrilled or excited about the outcome
  • Advise that you’re looking forward to receiving the written offer
  • Ask when they would like your response back by
  • Enthusiasm is fine, as it will indicate your interest in the offer.

New job aheadWritten offers give you the opportunity to negotiate. We’ve had roles that have been advertised at $70k- $90k, and settled on a figure in excess of $100k. Give yourself the opportunity to negotiate according to your experience and added value to a dealership – you’d be mad to accept verbally without a written confirmation. Get it in writing, then you can crack open the champagne.